It’s possible the 5mm dots were was only used on the FG-150 & FG-180. Inspecting a New-To-You Vintage Yamaha FG, Yamaha FG Serial Numbers, Interior Markings, and Labels – 1966 to 1981, Red Label FG’s, Differences Between the EARLY & COMMON Versions, Yamaha Early FG 6 & 7 Digit Serial Numbers, History of the Yamaha FG – 1966-1981 (US Models), Yamaha FG 5 Digit Japan Only Serial Numbers, Deconstructing a 1972 Yamaha FG-160 – 21107695, Added “Inspecting a New-To-You Yamaha FG” Article and PDF. Moving outward, the next difference is in the pick guard. The Yamaha Red Label FG5 recalls the company’s now-legendary 1960s-era Nippon Gakki Red Label acoustic guitars. Inspired by Yamaha’s iconic “red label” guitars of the 1960s, new FG Red Label folk guitars blend modern inspiration with a timeless design. Yamaha FG Serial Numbers, Interior Markings, and Labels – 1966 to 1981. Yamaha FG’s have gone thru many changes since their introduction in 1966. The size of the fret position dots decreases from 5mm to 3mm. I never noticed it until I was trying to duplicate the logo for a 1967 FG-180. The early tuner buttons are thicker. It’s also thicker around the sound hole (covers slightly more of the rosette). Not affiliated with the Yamaha Corporation. This change looks to have been made in early 1968. treated solid Sitka spruce top and scalloped top bracing to help deliver a rich midrange and low-frequency response. In late 1968 it was changed to the common triangular shape with the 3 tuning fork symbol and says “YAMAHA”. That said, it’s been retooled to meet the demands of modern guitarists. I haven’t spent any time looking for when the pick guard shape and end pin changed. For every observed Yamaha “Rule” there always seems to be a few exceptions. It’s possible this early label was only used on the FG-150 & FG-180. This was changed late 1969. The change to the common label happened in June/July 1967. It may not be obvious that there were subtle changes made between about 6 months and nearly 3 years after the Red label FG’s became available in the beginning of 1967. Inspired by Yamaha’s iconic “red label” guitars of the 1960s, new FG Red Label folk guitars blend modern inspiration with a timeless design. The guitars pictured in this article are my 1967 FG-150 (s/n 622548, date code 42.3.17), and 1971 FG-180 (no s/n, date code 46.7.??). 1967, and possibly early 1968, models have a fatter font. What we have in the test area today is a from the reissued Red Label range, a Japanese-built FG5. Some are obvious, some are not. The next change is less noticeable. Yamaha FG’s have gone thru many changes since their introduction in 1966. The first difference is in the label itself. Inspired by Yamaha’s iconic “red label” guitars of the 1960s, new FG Red Label folk guitars blend modern inspiration with a timeless design. RECOMMENDED VIDEOS FOR YOU... Volume 0% The most obvious difference is the later pick guard has a more pronounced protrusion at the fretboard end. Added 10/16/20 –  AND, I just discovered another minor variation in the gold YAMAHA logo on the headstock. The radii are larger on the body of the pick guard. The shape and material of the end pin changed from wood to plastic. I’ve found a couple of very early FG-110’s with the common label. It’s possible that these changes only apply to models FG-150 and FG-180, since those where the first models made. A solid Sitka spruce top and solid mahogany body yield maximum resonance and tone, which are further enhanced by Yamaha’s A.R.E. I’ve found early FG-110, FG-140 & FG-230 with 3mm dots. The lines above and below are also thicker. It became the 3 tuning fork symbol for models made for Japan. This only pertains to the FG-150 & FG-180, which have metal tuner buttons. I don’t yet have enough data to say exactly when this change was made, but the first guitar I’ve found with “thin” tuner buttons is December 1968, but I’ve found a few thin/fat models in the next 6 months. Made by Yamaha at its Custom Shop in Hammamatsu, Japan, the FG5 Red Label is a dreadnought acoustic guitar that features an A.R.E. The “budget” models FG-75, FG-110 & FG-140 have plastic tuner buttons, and all I’ve found have 3mm fret position dots and the common label. wood torrefication process. .245” (6.2mm) vs. .210” (5.3mm). Initially the truss rod cover was bell shaped and says “REINFORCED NECK”. Some are obvious, some are not. A site dedicated to identifying and repairing vintage Yamaha FG acoustic guitars. The last 3 are changes on the headstock. I’ve found a few early FG-75, FG-110, FG-140 & FG-230’s that break from these changes. It may not be obvious that there were subtle changes made between about 6 months and nearly 3 years after the Red label FG’s became available in the beginning of 1967. Initially “YAMAHA GUITAR” is shorter and bolder. Also, the marking at the top of the headstock stayed as “YAMAHA” for export models. The FG-230 (12 string) has smaller buttons and the lower priced FG-75, FG-110 & FG-140 have plastic buttons. After quietly celebrating the 50th anniversary of the iconic red label acoustics in 2016, Yamaha decided it was time to revisit the range, employing some modern tweaks and upgrades along the way.